As the Arctic continues to experience a period of intense and accelerating change it has become increasingly important to have better information on the status and trends of the Arctic environment.

Historically, monitoring practices in the Arctic have been largely fragmented and incomplete.

To address this shortcoming, the Arctic Council has increased long-term monitoring efforts and inventories to address key gaps in Arctic knowledge. These continuous efforts allow Arctic states to better facilitate the development and implementation of conservation and management strategies.

The 2004 Arctic Climate Impact Assessment (ACIA) recommended that long term Arctic biodiversity monitoring be expanded and enhanced.

In response, two of the Council's working groups — the Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna (CAFF) and Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program (AMAP) examined the report's findings and developed follow-up programs that address key projections for the future of the Arctic.

Arctic monitoring news

Snapshot of an ever-changing Arctic: The state of Arctic terrestrial biodiversity

Climate change is driving significant changes that could lead to ecological catastrophes in the Arctic
10 May 2021

Mercury from outside the Arctic is polluting the region

AMAP Working Group lays a scientific foundation while ACAP WG implements projects to stimulate actions to reduce emissions. This is how they work together to inspire chan...
10 May 2021

Ten years of sustained Arctic observing

The Arctic is undergoing rapid change. In order to understand the effects on ecological and socio-economic systems, as well as to implement mitigation and adaptation meas...
10 May 2021
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